tbt

Rik van Hemmen's picture
Thursday, September 18th, 2014

Dungeon Art (TBT)

Our office has a real dungeon where we keep our unused art, our extra gear, our historical records and our completed files.

 

Inevitably we need to clean out the dungeon when we no longer have space for the completed files and that means we literally get rid of dumpster loads of reports, depositions, shipping documents, drawings, manuals and photos.

 

We handle every file before it gets tossed because some of these files contain real treasures. Some files actually are moved completely to our historical section where they are kept forever and, undoubtedly, some of those files will show up in future TBTs.

 

At the last dungeon clean-out I came across this 1994 Henk van Hemmen sketch of an issue that was resolved long ago:

 

There are still many in the marine industry who remember Henk's technical sketching read more »

Hannah van Hemmen's picture
Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

SS Florida / SS Republic Collision (TBT)

A photo of the damaged SS Florida as a result of its collision with the SS Republic in 1909 hangs in our office.

 

 

On the back is an article from an unknown source (I'm betting that one of our consultants decided to look up the story one day).  The story reads as follows:

  read more »

Today's Throwback Thursday is one of the most famous shipboard fires, and is especially well-known in our area because the vessel was beached for several months in Asbury Park, New Jersey, not far from our current headquarters.  While the SS Morro Castle disaster of 1934 tragically killed 137 passengers, it directly resulted in numerous shipboard fire safety improvements (including fire alarms, improved fire drills, and the use of fire retardant materials), saving countless lives in the future.  Martin & Ottaway attended at the vessel on September 10, 1934 - almost 80 years ago - to determine the extent of damage.  Our field survey now hangs in the office:

 

 

Since 1764, Lloyd’s Register has published annually what is basically the definitive list of ocean-going vessels in the world.  Our office – and many other maritime offices worldwide – use these “registers” regularly, since they contain valuable, authoritative information on ship size, carrying capacity, age, builder, and equipment, to name a few.  We keep our old Lloyd’s Registers, since they can serve as a valuable reference for name changes, retrofits, prior owners, or scrapped vessels in our valuation and forensic investigations.  It’s interesting to see the change in style, and in size, of the Lloyd’s Registries over the years.

 

But my personal favorites are our 1940s Lloyd’s Registers:

 

  read more »

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Martin, Ottaway,
van Hemmen & Dolan, Inc.

172 Monmouth Street, Suite 201
Red Bank, NJ 07701
Office: (732) 224-1133
Office Fax: (732) 224-8631
info@martinottaway.com
Emergency No: +1 888 224-1133