Tag: interns

 

 

Project 114 is an innovative approach to engineering computations that is being developed for SNAME by Steve Hollister. In essence, it will be a suit of basic NAME computer programs that run on an Excel input/output backbone. This approach is quite powerful and runs a careful middle ground between large, canned, NAME program suites and home grown NAME computer programming. This effort is not meant to displace large powerful computational packages, but rather is meant to provide tools for occasional users and to allow a useful and standardized entry point for NAME amateurs, students and occasional users.

 

The project is further described at the SNAME website and at present a hydrostatics, a Savitsky and a basic powering module are available for experimentation. (beta testing?)  

 

In March we were contacted by Monmouth County's High Technology High School and asked if we could place a student for the Spring. High Tech High School is one of the Monmouth County Vocational High Schools with which M&O has a steady interation and is one of the best technical high schools in the country.

 

High Tech wanted Brady Donahue to attend at our office for 3 months of Fridays since he had expressed an interest in vehicle design. Fortunately we had the perfect job for him; to be the first true student guinea pig for Project 114. read more »

Rik van Hemmen's picture
Monday, December 21st, 2015

The Search for Oil Spill Data

The September 2014 issue of the US Navy Institute Proceedings had a one page article named “The Biggest Oil-Spill Culprit? Mother Nature”.

 

This article indicates that the sources of oil pollution in the ocean can be divided as follows:

 

Air pollution 4.2%

Run off 11%

Transportation Accidental Spills 9.8% (Marine)

Transportation normal operation 24.1% (Marine )

Natural Oil Seeps 47.3%

Extraction of Petroleum 2.9%

Jettisoned Fuel 0.6%

 

The article has a nice looking graphic and it provided me a chance to ponder this data.

 

In looking at this, most oil pollution occurs on the ocean. Air and land initiated pollution accounts for only 16%. This seems low to me. Mostly because non-point pollution is so difficult to capture and the world’s coastlines are very, very, long with the majority of the world’s population living near the coasts.

 

That made me wonder as to where this data came from, and I called in our present intern Jose Ramirez. It would be a perfect high school intern job to perform a little detective work on this graphic.

 

Jose performed a tremendous amount of sleuthing in trying to establish the source of the data and this information is provided below.

 

Since the story is long, I will provide the conclusion first:

 

There is no reliable quantitative data on ocean pollution, even in order of magnitude estimates, and don't believe any estimates unless you have been provided solid data

 

The above graphics represents a mishmash of data that is no more recent than the year 2001 and actually is an average of data going back as far as the 1970's. As such, it is disturbing that there is a 2015 article that references a graphic based on a 2003 report that is no better than orders of magnitude correct. So who is at fault here? The scientists attempting to make an estimate of oil polution in 2003? The fact that there is no more accurate more recent information? Or that authors recklessly cite inaccurate 2003 research results in a 2015 article on a subject that is in rapid flux.

 

Bottom line:

 

With regard to quantifying oil pollution in the oceans we are groping in the dark.

 

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In a prior blog I commented on ignorance and how easy it is to jump to incorrect solutions. In that blog I made reference to Boyan Slat and his Ted Lecture as an example of an incredibly awful Ted lecture.

 

In his lecture Boyan Slat proposes a method for removing plastic trash from oceans. The lecture is presented by an enthusiastic young man in front of a basically ignorant audience. With universal approval he makes a moving appeal for doing something we all want to do: Save our environment.

 

A friend sent me link to this lecture knowing that I am one of those seaweed hugging engineers and hoping that I would enjoy this young man’s resolve. Instead I was horrified.

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Our artist friend Mary Mattingly often contacts us for technical advice since she is very much interested in wetland and maritime community projects.

 

Often our involvement with her projects relates to providing her with assistance in finding solutions to floating her projects. (Actual flotation, not the financial kind)

 

As an artist Mary works with tiny budgets and often the largest cost component relates to the procurement of the float on which the project can be mounted. This blog presents an interesting flotation solution.

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Rik van Hemmen's picture
Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Ryszard Kaczmarek Can Do!

 

Maybe too often do we tout the power of interning and mentoring, but this week we received a heartwarming note from one of our past interns which started as follows:

 

Since you deserve a partial credit for your support, I thought you would want me to share this great news I received last week.

 

The attachment in that email shows that our 1990’s Virginia Tech AOE intern, Ryszard Kaczmarek has been selected as Naval Sea Systems Command 2015 Engineer of the Year and is a Federal Engineer of the Year Finalist.

 

Today Rich is a Naval Construction Battalion Lieutenant Commander. That makes him a Seabee and therefore makes him the acme of “Can Do!”.

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Engineering is an unusual profession. While it is often thought to be related to math and science and thought to be exact, it actually is a very complex blend of perspiration, inspiration, communication, confusion, calculation and evaluation and the math and science is only a tiny part of a much larger whole.

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