Tag: education

I am not sure if I have ever expounded on my theory on the path to the middle class in the M&O blog. The theory is simple: Only maritime provides a reliable path to the middle class for those who seek it. There are very good technical and economical reasons for that assertion, which I may make the subject of another blog some time in the future. Meanwhile, find me a solid middle class anywhere in the world, and I will bet that maritime had an important role in it.

 

Unfortunately, in the US, we have lost our connection with that reality, and our middle class is weakening as I am writing this, but, fortunately, there are people out there who are willing to make an effort to fix the problem.

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So here, at the end of the year, I have spent a few moments pondering the maritime events that affected my life. As usual, this is a personal list, but checking back against prior lists I am surprised that this list making can be very unpredictable. It almost seems that these annual lists carry a hidden common thread, and this year it seems the things that affected me most are not as clearly eventful as prior years. Instead they appear to be subtle, occasionally disturbing and occasionally promising and sometimes both.

 

Here we go: read more »

Rik van Hemmen's picture
Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Ryszard Kaczmarek Can Do!

 

Maybe too often do we tout the power of interning and mentoring, but this week we received a heartwarming note from one of our past interns which started as follows:

 

Since you deserve a partial credit for your support, I thought you would want me to share this great news I received last week.

 

The attachment in that email shows that our 1990’s Virginia Tech AOE intern, Ryszard Kaczmarek has been selected as Naval Sea Systems Command 2015 Engineer of the Year and is a Federal Engineer of the Year Finalist.

 

Today Rich is a Naval Construction Battalion Lieutenant Commander. That makes him a Seabee and therefore makes him the acme of “Can Do!”.

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Education in maritime is in a class by itself for too many reasons to count. Bottom line; maritime education works, and people are starting to take notice.

 

The strength of maritime education lies in integration. Basically it allows students to engage in multiple learning experiences simultaneously. Instead of one hour of language, one hour of math and one hour of science, the Holy Grail in education is to find a setting where one hour of education is the equivalent of three hours of language, math and science.

 

This often occurs in maritime education and that is why it is so effective (as described in this SNAME article by Gayle Horvath of NMHA), but just because it occurs, does not mean that it cannot be improved or enhanced.

 

 

On May 12, 2014, a very special group of New York Harbor stake holders made an announcement that provides an entirely new concept in maritime educational excellence.

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