Tag: cooperation

Holiday presents are always difficult to choose. I suppose a present is a two way street; it should delight the gift giver and the gift receiver equally. To find something that fits that bill is always a challenge.

 

Then to choose a Holiday present that suits everybody and that can be delivered over the internet is even more difficult. 

 

In thinking about that I am giving all our friends and clients all over the world at land and sea a copy of David JC McKay's book "Sustainable Energy, without the Hot Air".

 

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Over the years I try to write a blog around Christmas time that deals with the spirit of Christmas.

 

I have posted poems, art and stories, but this year a pass-it-forward present was dropped right into my lap.

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In the first half of 2015 Martin & Ottaway will be performing a study for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, "MAX1 Studies" (MARPOL Annex I Studies), that will address the following questions:

 

  1. How effective are shipboard Oily Water Separators?
  2.  
  3. What can be done to further increase the effectiveness of shipboard oily waste management?

 

The intent of MAX1 is to establish the deepest possible industry cooperative framework and seeks partners and participants to address the wide ranging issues concerning OWS systems and machinery space waste stream management.

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It may have become evident that I am of the opinion that the maritime community is a tower of strength for the spirit of cooperation, jointness and just getting the job done. I will provide yet another example of this, but first let me set the stage.

 

This year is the 350th anniversary of the founding of New Jersey. New Jersey was a little late in getting founded because it was controlled by the Dutch who were interested in maritime and trade, but not all that much in settling the landward side of Nieuw Amsterdam. This changed in 1663/1664 when the Dutch ceded Nieuw Amsterdam to England and British farmers who felt that it was time to officially settle the land we now know as New Jersey.

 

The most significant settlement that occurred was the arrival of a few English Quaker and Baptist families who left Gravesend Bay, Brooklyn and arrived in Monmouth County near the mouth of the Navesink River in the early summer of 1664.

 

They came by boat and our friends at Navesink Maritime Heritage Association felt we should commemorate this event with a visit to the Navesink by a proper vessel. It turns out we knew about such a vessel, it is the Onrust. read more »