Tag: BWT

When I joined Martin & Ottaway, Harry Ottaway told me that Francis Martin used a horse and carriage to be dropped off at the various surveys.


Roy Kanapaux, a surveyor that still worked with Martin & Ottaway in the early eighties (at age 80!) and whom I met when I visited my father at the office, never had a driver’s license and used cabs to get him to jobs. In the last few years that became difficult because there were certain areas of the New York waterfront where cabbies would drop you off, but not pick you up when you called from a pay phone.


I myself started with Martin & Ottaway when we just acquired personal 35mm compact cameras. Before that we shot in 110 format (ugh) or, much nicer, by means of a shipyard professional photographer. Today, digital photography is really just too cool, and since a picture tells a thousand words, emailing a picture is often much easier in trying to describe a complex problem than words alone.  


It can be argued that surveyors will adopt any technology that makes their life easier, and I suppose there is nothing wrong with that. We still occasionally use our ultrasonic hatchcover tester, not too long ago some surveyors tried rappelling gear for tank inspections and now we are messing with drones. All fun stuff, but, of all the new stuff, I like laser scanning best, because it accomplishes a task that I could not effectively perform before. read more »


With the first few fully certified Ballast Water Treatment systems now on the market, shipowners are slowly drifting into the purchase phase of compliance.


In the near future, a mechanical Ballast Water Treatment system will now need to be retrofitted on all large ships and ship’s crew will have a new piece of equipment that will need to be operated, monitored, and maintained.


Many equipment suppliers have invested their hearts, souls and hard earned dollars in designing and certifying Ballast Water Treatment Systems and now these systems will see the hard test of real life operation. In the simplest terms, this story played out on Oily Water Separators, and quite possibly there are some lessons to be learned from the OWS implementation history.

  read more »