Rik van Hemmen's blog

Mikael Elinder and Oscar Erixson of Uppsala University recently performed an interesting analysis of survival rates in a large number of major ship disasters ranging over a period of over 150 years. They were interested in determining whether the old adage "Woman and Children First" actually occurred in such disasters.

 

While many of their conclusions are statistically very dubious, their data indicates that women and children survival rates actually are substantially lower than men and crew in major shipping disasters.

 

The most significant exception is the Titanic where a much higher percentage of women and children did survive. This study was a statistical analysis, and while the numbers do support their findings, each disaster is unique and there may have been factors that would have resulted in lower women and children survival rates even if there was an intent to allow the women and children to enter the life boat first. Some of these disasters may have been so confusing that the order was never heard, others may have developed too quickly for any type of abandonment order to have taken place. And when panic develops, "Woman and Children First" (or any other type of group objective) is simply abandoned in the quest for individual survival.

 

However, quite possibly, Messrs. Elinder and Erixson's analysis just sheds light read more »

This cartoon was probably old when I first saw it in the eighties, but I would say the subject that it spoofs has not gotten much better.

 

 

Most of the above inspectors still show up, but today we can add Port State Control, P&I condition inspectors (especially hatch cover inspections), environmental auditors, ISM inspectors and the list goes on. M&O performs many of the above inspections and we truly symphatize with ship's personnel that has to manage all these port call duties during ever shorter port calls.

 

Recently M&O has been involved in research and development activities to reduce this inspection workload for the ship's crews. In October I will be presenting a paper on the subject at the SNAME annual meeting in Providence RI. read more »

M&O covers quite a range of waterfronts. Some we only visit occasionally (for example, Bahia Blanca, Argentina we visit no more than about once a decade) but others we visit on an almost daily basis.

 

The Delaware River ports are home turf for us, but every now and then we need to check the internet to make sure we show up at the right gate. Chris Law made such a website visit recently and came across this link:   http://www.holtlogistics.com/riverside-renewable-energy

 

This was such an interesting link that we copy the picture on it right here:

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This May we decided to perform a heavy duty office cleaning and we literally opened every file drawer in the office and in our storage basement to see what had to go and what needed to stay.

 

I came across one file that was marked "fax junk." Remember faxes and remember getting silly fax stuff from friends? This was one of the mother files. Next to all the silliness I came across a copy of this March 12, 1993 Journal of Commerce article:

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A recent bit in the news announced that the "Exxon Valdez" in its present incarnation as the "Oriental Nicety" is bound for the scrap yard.

 

It is easy to think of the "Exxon Valdez" as some villainous symbol in the drama of the oil spill in Alaska, but, as Paul Harvey used to say, then there is the rest of the story.

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Nobody has ever made a list of all the company's addresses in its 137 year history, but since the middle 1920's the firm has only had four addresses:

 

25 Broadway, NYC, the classic Cunard building in downtown Manhattan, where we were reportedly the first tenants after the main tenant, Cunard.

 

65 Broadway, NYC, which at the time was also the headquarters of ABS.

 

90 Washington Street, a very attractive 25th floor office with beautiful views of New York harbor.

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For the second time in three years we were asked to attend to damages of the shielding on the Brooklyn Bridge. Shielding is a type of staging that is fitted to a bridge when construction work is taking place, and both cases related to contact by a crane boom with the shielding that was suspended beneath the bridge. Fortunately nobody was hurt in either case. read more »

This week we lost a client and a dear friend with the untimely passing of Gerry Ginter.

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Rik van Hemmen's picture
Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

In Memoriam Chris Hanges, 1928-2012

On February 22nd, we lost a dear friend, colleague and sage counselor when Chris Hanges died peacefully in his sleep.

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Over the years many Arabian countries have built drydock facilities to open new industries to help them steer away from a completely oil dependent economy. Oman is the latest entrant to the list with their brand new facility in Duqm. The facility has two 400,000 ton graven docks and will also soon add a floating drydock. The facility is within an entirely new harbor and is just gorgeous with beautiful workshops and even the retired Kungsholm as a hotel facility.

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