August 2014

Wayne Thomas's picture
Wednesday, August 27th, 2014

NYMAR Victory!

They said it couldn't be done but Martin & Ottaway's representatives had the pleasure of winning the 3rd race of the August 7th NYMAR J/24 racing series.  Congrats Captain Peter and crew!

 

Our intern Matt Stern is guest blogging on some background research he did at our office on hydrogen fuel before he gets ready to start his junior year at the Bronx High School of Science:

 

 

 

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Congratulations to Yank Marine and NY Waterway on the rolling out of the hull of the passenger vessel P.V. Molly Pitcher on August 25, 2014.

 

 

M&O provides construction supervision and attended on behalf of Owners.  We caught the roll out on video too:

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Wood is a truly wonderful material, not just for its beauty, but also for its excellent engineering characteristics. While wood technology has been around for thousands of years for boat construction purposes, wood technology is still developing today.

 

In August of 1999, Woodenboat magazine published an article on a novel type of wooden mast construction. Masts originally were tree trunks. Tree trunks themselves are very efficient engineering structures, but for many centuries it has been known that a hollow tree is not much weaker than a solid tree. Similarly a hollow mast also is not much weaker than a solid mast and much lighter. And in sailboat design light is good and light weight high in the boat is awesome.

 

Therefore hollow masts were a feature of the fanciest wooden sailboats for many years, and with epoxy glues it became possible to glue together fancy hollow masts and hollow wooden masts were quite common. But still, not until the 1999 Woodenboat article did the boatbuilding world become aware of a very clever approach to hollow mast building that is now generally referred to as bird’s mouth mast construction.

 

If you look at the crosssection of the mast the term is obvious since it looks like a bunch of bird’s beaks biting their neighbors.  read more »

Hannah van Hemmen's picture
Wednesday, August 13th, 2014

SS Florida / SS Republic Collision (TBT)

A photo of the damaged SS Florida as a result of its collision with the SS Republic in 1909 hangs in our office.

 

 

On the back is an article from an unknown source (I'm betting that one of our consultants decided to look up the story one day).  The story reads as follows:

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Today's Throwback Thursday is one of the most famous shipboard fires, and is especially well-known in our area because the vessel was beached for several months in Asbury Park, New Jersey, not far from our current headquarters.  While the SS Morro Castle disaster of 1934 tragically killed 137 passengers, it directly resulted in numerous shipboard fire safety improvements (including fire alarms, improved fire drills, and the use of fire retardant materials), saving countless lives in the future.  Martin & Ottaway attended at the vessel on September 10, 1934 - almost 80 years ago - to determine the extent of damage.  Our field survey now hangs in the office:

 

 

 

In the early hours of July 27, 2014, a Donjon-SMIT NTVRP (Non-Tank Vessel Response Plan) vessel, a handysize bulk carrier, grounded in Lake St. Clair, near Detroit MI.

 

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