April 2014

The most fascinating aspect of the marine industry is the fact that it is nothing but a more technologically aggressive version of what takes place ashore. The world ashore changes and the world at sea changes just as fast. However, shore based technological concepts are all divided along the various technological stove pipes, while, at sea, technological aspects flow into the same pool of naval architects and marine engineers all day and somehow they have to deal with them and focus more tightly on efficiencies at the same time.

 

That means we get to be jacks of all trades (and, as some may argue; masters of none), but our much sharper drive to efficiency at sea often provides additional insights.

 

I just came across one of those issues in an article in Maritime Reporter. In the printed article (the printed article is better than the link I provided) Mr. Pospiech provides a very concise overview of Methane Slip.

 

Methane slip is methane that is not used as a fuel in an engine and basically escapes into the atmosphere. read more »

The OPA 90 Salvage Response regulations have now been in effect for a number of years and while there has not yet been a major US incident that tests the system to the limit, there have been a few smaller incidents where some lessons are being learned.

 

The most central issue in the US Salvage regulations focuses on first getting people in place as quickly as possible. There is no doubt that, in salvage, knowledgeable eyes on site is the single most effective driver in building the full subsequent response.

 

The USCG is well aware of that and has designed the regulations to require a very rapid on site response by salvors. At the inception of the tank vessel salvage requirements DonjonSMIT, one of the major US salvage response providers, tasked Martin & Ottaway with the development of a system that provides the ability to put knowledgeable personnel on site as soon as possible anywhere in USCG administered locations. read more »